Top 3 Tech Takeaways - CES 2018

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Tyler Wakstein, co-founder of OpenNest, returned from the Consumer Electronic Show in Las Vegas this week inspired about the future of technology. Here are his top 3 takeaways:

1. AI, Linguistics and Virtual Assistants
The future of voice and AI are evolving. Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa seemed to be in a head to head battle at CES to determine who would reign Queen, as the future of voice. The ability for brands to constantly interact with their consumers is attractive for marketers. In the end, Amazon will take the lead simply because of the world-renowned Amazon.com platform and consumers ability to ask Alexa to buy them anything. 

Google Home vs Amazon Echo. 

Google Home vs Amazon Echo. 

2. Sports x Tech

"Damn, I swear sports and music are so synonymous / Cause we want to be them and they want to be us," Drake sang in “Thank Me Now.” After spending a few days at CES with Russell Okung, two-time Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Los Angeles Chargers and friend of OpenNest, Tyler had similar thoughts about the dynamic between tech entrepreneurs and NFL players. 

Okung proudly represented the OneTeam Collective at the Consumer Electronic Show, designed by the NFLPA to accelerate growth for companies seeking to align with the sports industry and match current and former NFL players with business opportunities. One of their main investments was in StatMuse, a sports statistics database that lets you ask sports questions and hear a response from your favorite players. Keep your eye on the StatMuse this year - visionaries at the intersection of sports and technology.  

With OneTeam Collective and the GREATER Foundation, Okung’s goal is to provide at-risk youth, along with former athletes, a chance to gain experience inside this fast-growing tech industry so they can “create futures for themselves.” 

One Team Collective

One Team Collective


3. Self Driving Cars
All the buzz at CES was the launch of Lyft’s self driving car, in partnership with automotive technology company Aptiv. Lyft provided self-driving rides from the Las Vegas Convention to the Las Vegas Strip. Drivers sat in the front seat of the car, but took their hands off the wheel when the trip started. Soon enough the car was in autonomous driving mode. 

Raj Kapoor, Lyft’s chief strategy officer, insists that the transition to autonomous driving will be similar to the evolution from horse-drawn buggies to the first automotive vehicles. That there will be “a few here and there” in the beginning before they’re suddenly “everywhere,” he says.

Photo Courtesy: The Verge 

Photo Courtesy: The Verge 

Katie KilbrideComment